fbpx

Debunking one of (many) Facebook Scam Posts

News Feed Is Not Limited to Posts From 26 Friends

Copy-and-paste memes on Facebook — those blocks of text posted on message boards, forwarded in emails and shared via social media — are as old as the internet. A recent example started popping up in late 2017 and continues to see the occasional bump in shares. This meme claims that Facebook’s “new algorithm” is limiting the number of people whose posts show up in your News Feed, usually pegging the number at just 25 or 26 people. Readers are directed to comment on the post, which will supposedly “bypass the system” so that their posts show up in the future, and then copy and paste the text on their own Feeds.(Also called “click-jacking”)

Here’s one example of the meme, debunked by the Washington Post:

How to avoid hearing from the same 26 Facebook friends and nobody else:
Here is a post explaining why we don’t see all posts from our friends….
News feed recently shows only posts from the same few people, about 25, repeatedly the same, because Facebook has a new algorithm.
Their system chooses the people to read Your post. However, I would like to choose for myself, Therefore, I ask you a favor: if you read this message leave me a quick comment, a “hello”, a sticker, whatever you want, so you will appear in my news feed.
Don’t just “Like”, Facebook requires a “Comment”. Even one word! Thanks!!!
Otherwise Facebook chooses who to show me and instead I don’t need Facebook to choose my friends!
Do not hesitate to copy and paste on your wall so you can have more interaction with all your contacts and bypass the system. That’s why we don’t see all posts from our friends!

Though multiple publications have debunked this meme, it continues to persist. So, to clear things up: No, Facebook does not set a limit on the number of people whose posts are shown in your News Feed.

“The idea that News Feed only shows you posts from a set number of friends is a myth,” says Ramya Sethuraman, a product manager who works on ranking. “The goal of News Feed is to show you the posts that matter to you so that you have an enjoyable experience. If we somehow blocked you from seeing content from everyone but a small set of your friends, odds are you wouldn’t return.”

However, the persistence of the “26 friends” myth is understandable.

That’s because the posts in your News Feed are ranked in the order we believe you’ll be most interested in seeing them. The News Feed algorithms prioritize posts that are predicted to spark conversations among people, whether because of format — for example, live videos tend to lead to more discussions than regular videos — or because the posts were shared by people, groups or Pages you interact with frequently.

Because of this, it’s possible that you’ll see content from a similar list of posters at the top of your News Feed, which can make the “26 friends” idea seem plausible. If you scroll down, though, you’re likely to see posts from an even wider group of people.

Similarly, while leaving a single comment on a post won’t suddenly “unblock” you from showing up in your friends Feed (because there’s no arbitrary limit in the first place), there’s a grain of truth here, too. If you frequently trade comments with a friend, their posts are likely to be shown higher in your News Feed than posts from someone you never interact with.

If you want to control what you see in your News Feed, there are more straightforward ways to do it than by sharing memes. Because we know we don’t always get it right, we’ve built and are continuing to build new controls so that people can directly tell us what they want to prioritize, take a break from or get rid of. If you want to make sure you see everything from a certain person, you can use the See First feature to put that person’s posts at the top of your Feed. If you’ve heard too much from someone, you can Un-follow them. If you just want to take a break from someone, the Snooze feature removes them from your News Feed for 30 days.

Facebook LikeJacking

likejacking

And NO, Starbucks isn’t giving away free vouchers on Facebook
1. Via a Webpage
“Likejacking” is a Facebook-specific version of an attack called “clickjacking.” The purpose of the attack is to get you to click items on a webpage without your knowledge.

Facebook attackers present a web page that actually has two layers. The back layer is designed with a Facebook “Like” button configured to follow your mouse cursor. The front layer shows whichever lure you are unfortunate enough to be tricked by. No matter where you click on the webpage, whether it be “One of the craziest ways to eat a banana” or “101 Hottest Women in the World,” you are actually clicking the Facebook Like button and further spreading the spam.

The earliest instances of likejacking seemed to be a proof of concept that the attack would actually work. Since those first attacks, likejacking has evolved into a money-making scheme through a technique called affiliate marketing. Affiliate marketing pays the affiliate for every person who views an ad, signs up for a service or registers on a given site. We have yet to see these attacks lead to malicious content, but it is only matter of time until they do.

One reason this attack works is that Facebook does not require any confirmation when you click the Like button. Though confirmation would not entirely prevent the attack, it would complicate the attack and potentially discourage its active exploitation.

Users should carefully review their wall posts if they were tempted by and clicked through one of these scams. 
Reviewing installed Facebook applications periodically is also a smart idea to defend against many of the ways users are victimized on Facebook.

2. Via a Facebook Post

Here are a few common examples of likejacking:

  • An image of a sick or injured child with text claiming that Facebook will donate € 1.00 toward the child’s care for every like.
  • A false offer for a free voucher or gift card. These have included offers of € 50.00, € 100.00 and € 250.00 give-aways from certain well known mostly international Companies.
  • A bogus offer for a free iPad, iPhone or other popular electronic device.
  • An image of an attractive young woman along with a compelling message such as “The Prom Dress That Got This Girl Suspended From School.”
  • An Invitation to help some abandoned or mistreated animal.

Unfortunately these Posts play on peoples emotions and are therefor fairly effective.

To protect yourself from likejacking, security experts recommend that you use caution in clicking, liking or sharing posts and be extremely skeptical about any free offers.

X

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close